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Birth defects linked to Zoloft

Posted on Wednesday, October 16th, 2013 at 10:58 am by Williams Hart   

Like most antidepressants, taking Zoloft while you are pregnant can have profound adverse effects on your baby. Research also shows that if you have already started taking an antidepressant and stopped, chances are, your baby has been affected.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used to treat depression and anxiety disorders. Some of the documented birth defects it can cause include several congenital heart defects, anencephaly, and omphalocele. The New England Journal of Medicine specifically stated that Zoloft can have the following birth defects:

  • Anal atresia – anus is missing or in the wrong place
  • Limb reductions – poorly developed, missing, or deformed limb(s)
  • Club foot – limits the ability to walk

Any of these serious, possibly fatal birth defects can cause life-long complications for your child. To get the justice and compensation you might be owed due to the use of the dangerous drug Zoloft, call a lawyer from Williams Hart at (713) 352-7071.


Repairing omphalocele through surgery

Posted on Wednesday, August 14th, 2013 at 3:40 pm by Williams Hart   

Omphalocele, or the congenital abdominal defect in which internal organs like the intestines and liver are located in a sac outside the abdomen, can only be treated through surgery.

Surgery is needed to place the organs back inside the body where they belong. Depending on the severity of the omphalocele, it can either be fixed right away or will need to be done later in the baby’s life. Typically, the operation will consist of a surgeon sewing a man-made material over the omphalocele, eventually allowing the omphalocele to be pushed back into the stomach.

Unfortunately, omphalocele is one of the many congenital defects  linked to the use of the anti depressant drug Zoloft by pregnant women. If you believe your child has omphalocele due to Zoloft use during pregnancy, contact a lawyer from Williams Hart at (713) 352-7071 to find out how you may seek compensation.


Treating Craniosynostosis

Posted on Monday, July 15th, 2013 at 5:00 pm by Williams Hart   

Craniosynostosis, a birth defect in which the skull of a baby grows abnormally due to the premature closure of one or several joints in the bones of a baby’s skull before its brain is fully formed, can only be corrected through surgery.

Depending on the case, Craniosynostosis surgery is usually done during a child’s infancy. A team of surgeons and specialists, often ones who specialize in head and face surgery, will work with a neurosurgeon to repair the skull structure and relieve the pressure on the baby’s brain. Through surgery, the brain of the baby should grow normally and his or her appearance will be improved.

Sadly, Craniosynostosis is a birth defect that has also been linked to the use of Zoloft by women during pregnancy. If you or someone you know thinks their child acquired Craniosynostosis due to the use of Zoloft, contact a lawyer at Williams Hart by calling (713) 352-7071. We may be able to help you pursue legal action and obtain much-needed financial compensation.


Anal atresia treatment

Posted on Tuesday, July 9th, 2013 at 4:44 pm by Williams Hart   

Unfortunately, anal atresia, or the birth defect in which there is no opening to or an obstruction of the anus, may only be corrected by surgical intervention. The exact nature of the surgery will vary depending on the severity of the anal atresia, whether it is considered low or high anal atresia.

After high anal atresia is detected in a child, a surgical incision in the large intestine and abdomen, called a colostomy, is made to temporarily provide a way to expel feces. After a couple of months, the intestine will be moved to the sphincter in the area of the anus and a hole will be made in the skin.

For low anal atresia, a surgeon will create a hole in the skin in the location where the anus is supposed to be. Additional surgery may be needed later on to reposition the path of the intestine if the hole is placed in the wrong spot.

Anal atresia is, sadly, a birth defect that is also linked to Zoloft use by mothers while they are pregnant. At Williams Hart, our lawyers work to help those who have unduly developed this defect. Learn how you may be able to obtain compensation by calling (713) 352-7071.


Woman claims her daughter was harmed after using Zoloft

Posted on Monday, June 24th, 2013 at 2:39 pm by Williams Hart   

A Pennsylvania mother has recently claimed that her unborn daughter developed congenital heart defects after the mother’s use of the antidepressant drug Zoloft. According to the lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania on June 13, the mother is seeking compensation after her unborn daughter developed defects that required surgery to be corrected.

The mother was prescribed and took the anti-depressant drug Zoloft during pregnancy. The plaintiff’s daughter was born with severe heart defects and had to undergo several surgeries before she reached her first birthday. The plaintiff claimed Pfizer did not properly warn the public about the danger of its products.

Sadly, many babies have been born with birth defects due to Zoloft use during pregnancy. Our lawyers at Williams Hart may be able to help these victims and their families obtain just compensation for their losses however. Find out how we can help you by calling (713) 352-7071.

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